Lesson In Handling Conflict

In the book of 1 Samuel, chapter 30, there is an interesting and profoundly instructional story of David, the exiled rebel, and his leadership of a renegade band. As it follows, upon his return from consorting with the Philistines, David’s camp in the city of Ziklag has been invaded and burned to the ground. Everything was lost, all of the wives, children, and possessions have been taken away.
Right away an important lesson comes home to David in probably the harshest manner imaginable. David is attempting to preserve his life and vision of leadership by playing both sides of the fence, rubbing shoulders with the Philistines, but not heartily willing to fight against Israel, the nation of his origin.
In the conflict of physical and emotional loss, he comes to understand that survival is not enough. In the face of opposing allegiances, more than apparent integrity is needed. Leaders cannot sacrifice their integrity in order to satisfy external demands or fulfill their vision of a leadership role.
When you are simply attempting to survive in the midst of conflict, you not only open yourself to diminished integrity, but you also abrogate your responsibility for the welfare of others. At this point, all that is left is a time for deep heart felt sorrow.
Nevertheless, there are lessons to be learned from grieving. Leaders should embrace the compulsion to sorrow and grieve over the mistakes they have made. Serious time ought be devoted to reflecting on what went wrong and your responsibility for that wrong. Out of that reflection should come a determined response to correct all wrong and restore integrity which has been lacking.
As a result of your admission of wrong and failure to act with integrity, people may attempt to remove you from the position of leadership. Instead of trying to build you up, when people discover a chink, often, they may try to bring you down. When this occurs, you have got to know who you are and whose you are. Know that you were “created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God has before ordained that you should walk in them”.
In the book of 1 Samuel, chapter 30, there is an interesting and profoundly instructional story of David, the exiled rebel, and his leadership of a renegade band. As it follows, upon his return from consorting with the Philistines, David’s camp in the city of Ziklag has been invaded and burned to the ground. Everything was lost, all of the wives, children, and possessions have been taken away.
Right away an important lesson comes home to David in probably the harshest manner imaginable. David is attempting to preserve his life and vision of leadership by playing both sides of the fence, rubbing shoulders with the Philistines, but not heartily willing to fight against Israel, the nation of his origin.
In the conflict of physical and emotional loss, he comes to understand that survival is not enough. In the face of opposing allegiances, more than apparent integrity is needed. Leaders cannot sacrifice their integrity in order to satisfy external demands or fulfill their vision of a leadership role.
When you are simply attempting to survive in the midst of conflict, you not only open yourself to diminished integrity, but you also abrogate your responsibility for the welfare of others. At this point, all that is left is a time for deep heart felt sorrow.
Nevertheless, there are lessons to be learned from grieving. Leaders should embrace the compulsion to sorrow and grieve over the mistakes they have made. Serious time ought be devoted to reflecting on what went wrong and your responsibility for that wrong. Out of that reflection should come a determined response to correct all wrong and restore integrity which has been lacking.
As a result of your admission of wrong and failure to act with integrity, people may attempt to remove you from the position of leadership. Instead of trying to build you up, when people discover a chink, often, they may try to bring you down. When this occurs, you have got to know who you are and whose you are. Know that you were “created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God has before ordained that you should walk in them”.

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